Weight Loss and Diabetes

 Diabetes


In the United States there are 23.6 million children and adults who have diabetes about 7.8% of the population. Here is a fact about diabetes: if a person has a two hour blood glucose level between 140 and 199 they are classified as pre-diabetic, if their levels are higher than 200 they are classified as diabetic. It is the view of this author that many cases of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes can be prevented by controlling their blood glucose by losing weight.
As I have stated pre-diabetic is a condition where a person is close to being diabetic but cannot be diagnosed as being diabetic because their blood glucose levels are not high enough, but remember they are above normal. There is approximately 57 million Americans who are pre-diabetic on top of the 23.

6 already diagnosed. So as you can see this is quite a problem in the United States alone. If you become diabetic yourself this is something to think about. Both men and women diabetics who allow their blood glucose levels to go unchecked are at risk of the following: Heart Disease and Stroke, High Blood Pressure, Blindness, Kidney Disease, Nervous System Damage, Amputations from bad blood circulation, Dental Disease, Pregnancy Complications, and Sexual Dysfunction. All of these occur in many people before they are even diagnosed as diabetic.

All research today, shows that if a person is diagnosed as diabetic the best course of action is for that person to lose weight. Losing weight soon after being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes produces lasting benefits, like increased blood flow and circulation, reductions of blood pressure. Losing weight will give a person better control of their blood glucose and decrease the events of having a cardiovascular complications. Also the research tells us that people who lost an average of 9.8 percent of their body weight within a year and a half after diagnosis were better able to achieve their blood glucose and blood pressure goals. What is really neat is that later weight gain does not negate the benefits of the early weight loss. Another point has to be made here.

I was diagnosed in my thirties with diabetes. I weighed 350 pounds, I had blurry vision, numbness in my hands and feet, and my skin hurt all the time. My initial blood glucose levels measured 525. My doctor wanted to put me on insulin right away, but I was afraid of needles and I was able to make a deal with my doctor that if I could lower my glucose levels enough I could stay on pill medication. Well, the first thing the nurse told me was to exercise and lose the weight. Three weeks later I had lost 10 pounds and lowered by 35 points. A year later, I weighed 200 pounds and my blood glucose levels were at 120 after eating. I found that weight loss under a good program and exercising kept me from going under the needle, and the lasting benefit of being healthier.

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